Join Us as We Kick Off The Weekend With Petty’s 50 Greatest, Plus Raitt-Browne-Colvin-Hornsby-Lindley-Ingram On Stage, Friday, April 2, 2021

Good Morning, Musicologists! It’s a fine mix we have here to day for you. The sun is out on this crisp, cool spring day and we have quite a line-up planned.

Coming up this evening, it’s the Dream Team, 1999

Here’s today’s line-up:

12:00 p.m. Deb’s Stream: Tom Petty’s 50 Greatest Hits

Yes, it’s all subjective folks. Next week, I could change this up. But for now, these are my Petty favorites, and not just with his mates in The Heartbreakers, but also solo, with the Traveling Wilburys, and with Mudcrutch. Changing it up kept Tom Petty’s creative juices fresh and flowing, and it shows.

7:00 p.m. The Dream Team 1999: Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne, Shawn Colvin, Bruce Hornsby, David Lindley, and Wally Ingram, Live at Red Rocks, Morrison, Colorado, September 12, 1999 NEW!

I actually saw this performance myself when it passed through the Tweeter Center in Mansfield, Massachusetts. (Or was it the Comcast Center by then? Well, no matter.) It’s a dream team by anyone’s standards, and it was a fantastic concert. We have a version of this for you here this evening, and we hope you enjoy it.

Tune us in, folks. We’re free and totally outside the system. We do not make a profit. We do not accept advertising. We do not ask for a “subscription” or a credit card.

And for those of you who use Spotify, be advised that it’s now owned by Kanye West. That would be enough for me to forsake my subscription.

www.tinyurl.com/Ungovernable-Radio

Good Morning From The College of Rock n’ Roll Knowledge: 12/13/2020

Yes, it’s another Sunday here in the College of Rock n’ Roll Knowledge where we never really sleep. We just rest our eyes for a spell. We welcome you back!

Paul and George at The Cavern Club.

Here’s today’s lesson!

December 13, 1961: The Beatles signed Brian Epstein to manage them.

On the same day, Mike Smith of Decca Records arrived at the Cavern Club to see The Beatles perform. He determined after that the band had “no future in music.” Boy, did he fuck that one up, right?

December 13, 1962: Elvis Presley’s Return to Sender became his 13th #1 song in the US.

December 13, 1966: Jimi Hendrix recorded Foxy Lady. (It was misspelled on the US version of the album as Foxey Lady.) He also made his television debut on Ready Steady Go! on ITV in the UK.

December 13, 1967: The Grateful Dead perform the song Dark Star for the first time ever in concert at The Shrine Exhbition Hall in Los Angeles. It becomes a Deadhead favorite and is the conduit for some of their most fabled jams. The studio version, oddly enough, ran only 2:44.

December 13, 1969: Someday We’ll Be Together by the Supremes took over the #1 spot on the R & B chart.

Also on this day, Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head by B.J. Thomas shot up to #1 on the Adult chart, and moved into the Top 10 overall.

And speaking of the guys with no future in music, The Beatles’ Abbey Road made it seven weeks at #1 on the Album chart.

December 13, 1970: Dave Edmunds went to #1 on the UK chart with I Hear You Knocking.

December 13, 1986: Bruce Hornsby & The Range top the charts with The Way It Is, an excellent debut song from this band about the U.S. Civil Rights movement. Did you know that Bruce Hornsby was the keyboardist for The Grateful Dead for several years running?

Born On This Day

December 13, 1933: Lou Adler was born in Chicago. Adler has an amazing musical history. He was the founder of Dunhill Records, where he produced The Mamas & The Papas, Johnny Rivers, The Grass Roots, Carole King and Barry McGuire (Eve of Destruction). He was also the architect of 1967’s Monterey Pop Festival, and managed Jan & Dean. Whew.

December 13, 1948: Jeff “Skunk” Baxter, veteran of two great bands — Steely Dan and The Doobie Brothers — was born in Washington, D.C.

School’s out for today, children! Have a wonderful day, and stick around for our line-up!

It’s Monday Morning Back at The College of Rock n’ Roll Knowledge: 11/23/2020

And so begins another week. Here at the Mermaid Lounge, we’re trying to accomplish the impossible: Programming a week in advance. It’s a valiant effort, but the jury is OUT. Nevertheless, we have a lot of info here for you.

The very first juke box at the Palais Royal Hotel in San Francisco

November 23, 1899: The first jukebox was placed at The Palais Royale Hotel in San Francisco (see photo).

November 23, 1962: The Beatles auditioned at St. James’ Church Hall in London for The BBC, which was looking for people with potential to be on TV. The Beatles failed. I wonder if the guy who made that decision kept his job.

November 23, 1963: Jimmy Gilmer & The Fireballs have the top R & B song with Sugar Shack.

November 23, 1964: /The Beatles release the single, I Feel Fine. The B-side is She’s A Woman.

The Rolling Stones are late for the radio shows Top Gear and Saturday Club, and were banned by The BBC.

November 23, 1965: The Beatles film promos for I Feel Fine, Ticket To Ride, Help!, Day Tripper and We Can Work It Out at Twickenham Studios in London. The BBC paid 1,750 pounds for the broadcast rights, and then deals were made with other broadcasters around the world.

November 23, 1967: The Who played the New Barn at The Lions Delaware County Fairgrounds in Muncie, Indiana.

November 23, 1968: Little known fact, here: After Dusty Springfield had recommended Jimmy Page to Ahmet Ertegun, head of Atlantic Records, Led Zeppelin manager Peter Grant finalized their recording contract.

Steve Miller debuted on the charts after his first single, Living in The USA.

The Beatles tied the existing rock era record (held by Bobby Darin’s Mack The Knife) with a ninth week at #1 for Hey Jude.

Judy Collins’ version of Joni Mitchell’s Both Sides Now enters the Top 40, where it will peak at #8. It will also win The Best Folk Performance of the year.

November 23, 1970: George Harrison released his first solo single, My Sweet Lord, in the US.

November 23, 1972: Bob Dylan arrives in Durango, Colorado, to film the movie Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid (Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door).

November 23, 1975: Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody goes to #1 on the UK charts, where it will remain for nine weeks.

November 23, 1976: Wings kicked off a 19-date UK tour at The Royal Court in Liverpool.

November 23, 1983: Tom Evans of Badfinger committed suicide after the band decided to break up.

Born On This Day

November 23, 1939: Betty Everett, of The Shoop Shoop Song (It’s In His Kiss) fame, was born in Greenwood, Mississippi.

November 23, 1940: Freddie Marsden, drummer for Gerry & The Pacemakers, was born in Liverpool.

November 23, 1954: Bruce Hornsby, one of the greatest keyboardists ever, leader of Bruce Hornsby & The Range and keyboardist for The Grateful Dead, was born in Williamsburg, Virginia.

And that is it, children. Today’s lesson is over.